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A close look to ChibiOS demos for STM32

A close look to ChibiOS demos for STM32

In this article we are going to take a deep look to ChibiOS default demos explaining how they works. We will also see how to create a new project and how to modify it in in order to create our own applications.

ChibiOS default demo are usually composed by some different folders and files. As example, in figure we can see the resources of the default demo for STM32 Nucleo F401RE. In general all the ChibiOS’ projects are characterised by a similar anatomy.

They all have some folders, some configuration headers, a source file named main.c and a makefile. Additional notes continue reading...

From 0 to STM32

From 0 to STM32

Nowadays, we are surrounded by smart objects capable to do incredible things. These objects, known as Smart Things, are now able to communicate over different wired and wireless communication channels. The obvious consequence is that these objects are able to get and push data through the Internet: this phenomenon, this network of Smart Things, is commonly known as the Internet of Things or IoT. The spreading of the IoT is substantially due to two main con-causes:

the evolution of Microcontrollers which are increasing their performances while their price is continue reading...

Detecting obstacles using an ultrasonic sensor HC-SR04

Detecting obstacles using an ultrasonic sensor HC-SR04

HC-SR04 is a commonly used ultrasonic sensor which is capable to detect obstacles in a range of 2-300cm. The sensor looks like a small PCB having two metal cylinders on the front-side and a small circuit on the back-side (see Fig.1).

In this article we will provide a simple demo to use HC-SR04. This requires a preliminary read of the sensor user manual: HC-SR04 User Manual

The sensor has 4 PIN:

VCC, which must be connected to 5V; Trig, which is an input PIN to trigger the measurement; Echo, which is an output PIN which sent out a square wave; GND, which must be continue reading...

How to drive a HD44780 with I2C backpack with a STM32

How to drive a HD44780 with I2C backpack with a STM32

The HD44780 is a de-facto standard controller for display. We have already use it providing a source code to use a 16×2 LCD with a STM32. In this article we will step over introducing an I2C backpack for that display. Of course we will explain how to edit old code in order to get it work with this new hardware configuration.

Even if it is still popular, this controller was made commercially available in the late eighties. At that time serial communications were not so widespread because their were costly and involved constraint about clock speed. Because of that, the continue reading...

Getting started with mikroe BUZZ Click using ChibiOS/HAL

Getting started with mikroe BUZZ Click using ChibiOS/HAL

BUZZ Click is a click board with a mikroBus form factor. It is substantially composed of a piezoelectric speaker having a resonant frequency at 3.8 kHz: this means we should expect best performances at this frequency. Let’s take a look to the principle of operation of DC and AC buzzer.

A piezoelectric loudspeaker also known as buzzer uses the inverse piezoelectric effect for generating sound. The piezoelectricity is a phenomena where mechanical stress produces the accumulation of electrical charges and then a voltage across the material. The inverse principle is true continue reading...