STM32

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Dealing with push-buttons using an STM32

This article contains some simple examples to understand how to deal with push-buttons when you are approaching STM32 and ChibiOS. The button can be considered the simplest input peripheral that can be connected to a microcontroller. Because of that, usually, every embedded development board is equipped with a button marked as “User Button” and this means it is actually connected to a GPIO pin you can read via software.

To understand this article with proficiency, you should match few requirements:

You should have an STM32 development kit and be able to do basic stuff continue reading...

Dealing with LEDs using an STM32

This article includes some simple examples to understand how to deal with LEDs when you are approaching STM32 and ChibiOS. The LED can be considered the simplest peripheral output you can connect to a microcontroller. Because of that, usually, every embedded development board is equipped with a LED marked as “User LED” and this means that it is actually connected to a GPIO pin you can drive via software.

To understand this article with proficiency you should match few requirements:

You should have an STM32 development kit and be able to do basic stuff with ChibiStudio continue reading...

Using STM32 GPIO with ChibiOS PAL Driver

The STM32 is equipped with an extremely flexible General Purpose Input Output (or GPIO) peripheral allowing to configure each Input/Output independently. The IO is the simplest interface between the STM32 and the outside world.

As we said in the article “From 0 to STM32“, there are many versions of the same peripherals across the various STM32’s sub-families and this is way each sub-family usually has its own Reference Manual. In this document it is possible to find all the functional information about GPIO and reading many RM we can notice that GPIO peripheral has three continue reading...

A close look to ChibiOS demos for STM32

A close look to ChibiOS demos for STM32

In this article, we are going to take a deep look to ChibiOS default demos explaining how they work. We will also see how to create a new project and how to modify it in in order to create our own applications.

A ChibiOS’ default demo is usually composed of some different folders and files. For example, in figure, we can see the resources of the default demo for STM32 Nucleo F401RE. In general, all the ChibiOS’ projects are characterized by similar anatomy.

All demos have some folders, some configuration headers, a source file named main.c and a makefile. Additional continue reading...

Developing on STM32: introducing ChibiStudio

Developing with STM32 introducing ChibiStudio

In this article, we are going to set-up a ready-to-use Eclipse-based toolchain named ChibiStudio for the development on STM32. We will also explore this development toolchain explaining some basic operations necessary for daily development. So we will introduce the ChibiOS project, we will setup ChibiStudio taking a tour of some parts of it, we will import some ready to use projects and perform our first flash and run. Note that to proceed with this tutorial is necessary the installation of ST-Link drivers: this procedure has been shown in the previous article From 0 to continue reading...